DNA DAMAGE now stated as an effect of RF Exposure in US  National Toxicology Study.

Just before Thanksgiving, the US National Toxicology Program updated its website on its $30 million cell phone radiation studies that was commissioned by the FDA in 1999.  (Background: Because the FDA conducted no market safety testing on cell phones prior to authorizing their release for sale in 1985, in 1999 the U.S. FDA commissioned the National Toxicology Program, NTP, part of the US Dept of Health, to study  potential health effects from long-term exposure to cell phone radiation.   Here’s the FDA letter, stating its concern  that the FCC exposure limits protect only against heating effects and its concern for potential health effects such as increased lymphomas seen in animal studies:  https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/htdocs/chem_background/exsumpdf/wireless051999_508.pdf ) 

BEFORE THE UPDATE, IT HAD STATED:

The NTP studies found that high exposure to RFR (900 MHz) used by cell phones was associated with:

Clear evidence of tumors in the hearts of male rats. The tumors were malignant schwannomas. 

Some evidence of tumors in the brains of male rats. The tumors were malignant gliomas. 

Some evidence of tumors in the adrenal glands of male rats. The tumors were benign, malignant, or complex combined pheochromocytoma.

WITH THE UPDATE, THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION WAS ADDED:

NTP scientists found that RFR exposure was associated with an increase in DNA damage. Specifically, they found RFR exposure was linked with significant increases in DNA damage in the frontal cortex of the brain in male mice, the blood cells of female mice, and the hippocampus of male rats.

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